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Marathon Coach in Leggett

By Jessica | Metabolic Efficiency Coach

10 Things Every Successful Marathon Coach in Leggett Does

What makes for a successful Metabolic Efficiency coach?

It’s not just what you know… it’s what you do (every day). Here are some of the practices elite coaches use to get results. Keep track of how many you’ve mastered.

You know the type. It’s the coach that seems to have to it all together.

They have a long waiting list of eager prospects. Their client results are always impressive. They make great money doing what they love. And, just to make us all a little more jealous, they make it look effortless.

Welcome to the elite Metabolic Efficiency coach.

What is it that makes elite Metabolic Efficiency coaches so special?

Is it their training? Their hard work and commitment? Their passion? Or do they know something most others don’t?

The answer to all of those question is… yes.

Elite Metabolic Efficiency coaches do know something most don’t. But it’s not just knowledge. It’s a set of practices they work on daily.

And this set of practices helps them get better at forming strong relationships with their clients, fostering change, and improving their craft.

Here are the active habits that set elite coaches apart from the rest.

1. Elite Metabolic Efficiency coaches practice the art of human connection.

Better coaches aren’t just better at customizing workout and nutrition plans. They’re better with people.

Elite Metabolic Efficiency coachs don’t limit conversations to “here’s what you have to do”; they speak to clients in a way that nurtures real human connection.

By asking sincere questions, expressing compassion and being a steady source of support, they help guide their clients around obstacles so they can achieve their goals.

To practice this approach:

Ask leading questions that help clients open up and explore, imagine, or build on past successes. For example:

If things were better with your eating/exercise, what would be different in your life? What would you do more of? Less of? Be proud of?

Imagine that you have the body and health you want. What did it take for you to achieve it? What did you have to give up?

What have you had success with in the past? How can we do more of that and apply it to your health and fitness?”

And once you ask, really listen to their responses. Let them sink in. Learn from them. (For more on this approach, check out: Effective coach talk: What to say to clients and why it matters).

2. Elite Metabolic Efficiency coaches ask ‘why’. (Again… and again… and again.)

You have actually most likely seen it a million times. New customers get a taste for how hard it is to change their eating practices, do the additional 10 squats, run another mile, and rearrange their lives for all of it ... and all of a sudden they do not want it so terribly, after all. Elite coaches have a way of motivating their customers-- in each session-- to want the hard work. They know ways to open their customers' deeper motivation, sense of function, and inner fire. How do they do this? For one thing, they know how to ask their customers why. To practice this approach: Use the '5 Whys' method. Here's how it works: When developing objectives with your clients, you ask them why. Q: "Why do you wish to achieve this?" A: "Due to the fact that I want to drop weight." Then, whatever answer they create, you ask why again. Q: "And why do you want to lose weight in the first place?" A: "Because I used to be thinner and am embarrassed by how heavy I have actually gotten." Continue asking why for a total of five times. It's surprisingly tough-- and surprisingly efficient at getting to people's core inspirations. ( By the way, elite coaches use 'the Five Whys' on themselves. Because they understand that getting to the heart of their own inspiration is the best location to start.)

3. Elite Metabolic Efficiency coaches help the “competition.”

Want to know a secret? To an elite coach in Leggett, there’s no such thing as competition.

Elite coaches don’t feel insecure about what other coaches are doing because they know how to use their individuality as an advantage in their careers.

Rather than hiding and hoarding their knowledge, elite coaches share that knowledge and facilitate conversations, and in doing so build a trusted tribe around them.

Find your tribe and help make those in your tribe successful, and you’ll be more likely to succeed, too.

To practice this approach:

Get engaged with other people’s content and social feeds.

Take the extra few minutes to leave iTunes reviews on their podcasts; review their books on Amazon; share their Facebook posts; and so on.

These simple actions will help them build their expertise and broaden their reach. As a bonus, you might expand your own social networks in the process.

To take this concept up a notch, consider starting a Facebook group or other social community to serve as a source of mutual support, discussion, and inspiration. You’ll be able to answer questions and help your peers�”and position yourself as an expert, too.

4. Elite coaches do less.

“Doing it all” is a myth.

Spreading yourself too thin is a first-class ticket to disappointment and failure. Instead, top-notch coaches in Leggett figure out what’s truly crucial among their particular market and clientele, and do that.

Metabolic Efficiency coaches also know their clients can’t do it all. They know that giving clients just one small habit at a time is far more effective than throwing an ambitious project at them and hoping for the best.

To practice this approach:

Give the ‘one habit method’ a try.

Of all the things your client wants to do and achieve, work with them to figure out which goal is most important to them right now. Then, based on their goal, help choose just one habit to start practicing today.

The habit should be so simple it almost feels “too easy” and it should be something they can do in just five or ten minutes, every single day.

Have your client practice that one habit every day for a minimum of two weeks. Ask them to check back in with you regularly to let you know whether or not they’ve completed the task.

5. Elite Metabolic Efficiency coaches practice the basics.

Bruce Lee stated: "I fear not the man who has practiced 10,000 kicks once, however I fear the man who has actually practiced one kick 10,000 times." Kick Guy never ever had to have the perfect kick. All he had to do was focus on mastering the process and being outstanding with all the pieces. And that sufficed to frighten Bruce Lee. (Pretty frightening.). Elite coaches are like Kick Guy. They want to practice methods-- even the basic ones-- again and again so they can move towards real proficiency. They take this technique to their clients, too, helping them put their own structure in place and obtain the abilities they have to prosper in sustainable modification. To practice this method:. Return to basics with something you delight in doing and consider yourself 'pretty good' at. Reflect to the initial abilities you learned to do that thing. If you're a fighter, for instance, consider your stance, your hip motion, or your jab. Could you gain from drills concentrating on your core methods? Or, if you once struggled with poor consuming routines, pay attention at mealtime. Do you still eat as gradually and mindfully as you when did? Would you take advantage of paying more attention to how complete you feel at the end of each meal? Choose one elemental thing you might draw from 'great' to 'excellent' or 'fantastic' to 'positively killer.' Then work on enhancing that a person thing. Solicit aid from a coworker or peer if you like. It might feel unusual to act like a beginner once again, but by doing so, you're on your way to proficiency.

6. Elite Metabolic Efficiency coaches listen for what they don’t want to hear.

Many coaches (quite logically) focus on trying to strengthen their clients’ motivation�”the side of them that is interested in change.

But in the early stages of client development, it doesn’t work. Because that other side�”the part that is scared of change and resistant to your efforts�”is ridiculously strong. After all, it’s been preventing your client from changing for a long time.

In order to get your clients moving in the right direction, coaches have to do something that might sound a bit paradoxical: they have to hear out the resistance first.

Elite coaches in Leggett TX listen for the resistance. They seek it out. Because they know they have to work with it, rather than against it.

To practice this approach:

Listen for your own resistance.

Think of something you’ve been wanting to change, but haven’t gotten around to yet. Tip: think of all the things you’ve been telling yourself you should or shouldn’t do.

Write down the thing you want to change. Then ask yourself:

What is GOOD for me about NOT changing? (In other words, how does NOT changing benefit me or help me solve a problem?)

What would be BAD about changing? What might I have to give up or lose?
Write down your answers.

How do you feel? Your resistance might feel a little calmer or quieter; you might feel a little more ready for change. Now that you understand your own resistance a little better, you can listen for it in client conversations, too.

7. Elite coaches know when to shut up.

Elite coaches in Leggett have a lot of expertise, but that doesn’t mean they always vocalize it.

Think about it: When someone asks, “What should I eat after exercising?” an expert answers the question: “You should eat protein and carbs.”

But when a client asks “What should I eat after exercise?” a coach asks, “Tell me about your training program and what you feel you can manage?” Coaches even consider “What do you like to eat after exercise?”

Metabolic Efficiency coach doesn’t mind being quiet, asking questions or fading into the background a bit.

Many fitness professionals try to be both expert and coach at the same time. But that never works. You can’t talk and listen at the same time. You have to know how and when to switch back and forth between the two.

In other words: you need to know when to stop talking and listen.

To practice this approach:

Try using this ‘expert vs coach’ checklist on yourself:

With your clients, do you spend most of your time…

Expert
Coach

Talking and telling…
or Listening and reflecting?

Telling them what you know…
or Sharing what you’re working on?

Answering questions?
or Asking questions?

Letting the client set the tone?
or Leading the client towards a decision or action?

Pointing and directing?
or Guiding and accompanying?

Taking the spotlight
or Fading into the background?

If you find yourself more on the ‘expert’ side of things, try actively practicing some of the actions on the ‘coach’ side.

8. Elite Metabolic Efficiency coaches practice being imperfect.

Lots of health and fitness professionals have high standards; most of us want to walk the walk. Moreover, we want to look like we walk the walk.

So we try to refine our own health habits, working practices, and self-presentation. We know that our bodies are often advertisements for our services, so we worry about looking our best.

But too often, we try to be perfect. And that becomes our downfall.

Sure, on the one hand, a little fire keeps you energized and sharp. But too much pressure is a parking brake on performance.

(Ever choked during a game or competition? You were probably overwhelmed by pressure. It happens to athletes all the time.)

So while elite coaches strive for excellence, they don’t try to be perfect�”and they don’t expect their clients to be perfect, either.

To practice this approach:

Try sharing a little of your own imperfect experience with your clients.

When they’re fumbling with something, tell them about a time you felt awkward, embarrassed or uncomfortable yourself, either when working on your own fitness and nutrition journey or another time you were struggling to learn something new.

When they’re feeling like a failure, let them know everyone falls down sometimes: share one of your own mistakes�”and maybe even how you fixed it.

9. Elite coaches keep it real.

If you work in the fitness and health industry, it’s easy to throw around a lot of ideas.

Stuff like this:

  • Never eat processed food.
  • Always eat local, seasonal, organic food.

On the surface, it’s hard to argue against either. But really? Unless you’re living in a yurt somewhere and growing all your own food from the ground up, I doubt you’re always eating whole, unprocessed, local, seasonal, organic food.

Which means those nutrition ideals aren’t aspirational �” they’re impossible. Even for the world’s top Metabolic Efficiency experts.

Elite coaches in Leggett Texas are willing to do a reality check. They realize that people don’t need a nutritional deity to follow. They don’t need strict codes of conduct that includes words like “should”, “always”, and “never”.

Instead of coaching from a place of fantasy, elite coaches stay grounded. They help their clients make progress, bit by bit.

To practice this approach:

Examine the rules you’ve set.

Consider all the “rules” and expectations around fitness, nutrition, and health. Write down as many as you can think of. Be sure to include words like “should”, “always”, and “never”.

  • You should always…
  • You should never…
  • Being “fit” means you always…
  • Being “healthy” means you never…
  • Eating “nutritiously” means…

Now read your answers and think about whether a client could reasonably “always” or “never” do them.

10.  Elite Metabolic Efficiency coaches ask for help.

If you’re coaching other people in Leggett, Texas, it only makes sense that you’ve experienced coaching yourself.

After all, if you’ve never been coached through something, you can’t possibly understand what your clients are experiencing, thinking, and feeling.

Elite coaches know this. They seek out mentorship and get coaching themselves. Sometimes it’s not even fitness related. It might be for their business, or their personal life (like how to be a better parent or partner), or a hobby they’re particularly passionate about.

The important thing is that that they are willing to ask for help, to make themselves vulnerable, to go through the process of change… just like their clients.

And they know how powerful that process of change can be.

To practice this approach:

Make your coaching checklist.

What areas of expertise do you seek?

  • Nutritional science?
  • Coaching psychology?
  • Business strategy?
  • Professional development?
  • General life wisdom?
  • What kind of a mentor or coach would you like?
  • What kind of a person are they?
  • What sort of reputation do they have?

What would you want them to show you or tell you in order for you to feel they were the “right fit.”
Now think about people in your life (whether paid professionals, colleagues or friends) who may fit your criteria. If someone springs to mind, great. Ask if they’d be willing to lend their expertise and support to the thing you’d like help with.

Or if you need to do more research, that’s cool too.

What to do next

Other Leggett TX Information:

Nutrition and Fitness Coaching
Marathon Coach in Leggett Video
Weather in Leggett TX

Endurance training

Endurance training is the act of exercising to increase endurance. The term endurance training generally refers to training the aerobic system as opposed to the anaerobic system. The need for endurance in sports is often predicated as the need of cardiovascular and simple muscular endurance, but the issue of endurance is far more complex. Endurance can be divided into two categories including: general endurance and specific endurance. It can be shown that endurance in sport is closely tied to the execution of skill and technique. A well conditioned athlete can be defined as, the athlete who executes his or her technique consistently and effectively with the least effort.[1]

Endurance training is essential for a variety of endurance sports. A notable example is distance running events (800 meters upwards to marathon and ultra-marathon) with the required degree of endurance training increasing with race distance. Two other popular examples are cycling (particularly road cycling) and competitive swimming. These three endurance sports are combined in triathlon. Other sports for which extensive amounts of endurance training are required include rowing and cross country skiing. Athletes can also undergo endurance training when their sport may not necessarily be an endurance sport in the whole sense but may still demand some endurance. For instance aerobic endurance is necessary (to varying extents) in racket sports, football, rugby, martial arts, basketball and cricket. Endurance exercise tends to be popular with non-athletes for the purpose of increasing general fitness or burning more calories to increase weight loss potential.

Long-term endurance training induces many physiological adaptations both centrally and peripherally mediated. Central cardiovascular adaptations include decreased heart rate, increased stroke volume of the heart,[2] increased blood plasma, without any major changes in red blood cell count, which reduces blood viscosity and increased cardiac output as well as total mitochondrial volume in the muscle fibers used in the training (i.e. the thigh muscles in runners will have more mitochondria than the thigh muscles of swimmers). Mitochondria increase in both number and size and there are similar increases in myoglobin and oxidative enzymes. Adaptations of the peripheral include capillarization, that is an increase in the surface area that both the venous and arterial capillaries supply. This also allows for increased heat dissipation during strenuous exercise. The muscles heighten their glycogen and fat storing capabilities in endurance athletes in order to increase the length in time in which they can perform work. Endurance training primarily work the slow twitch (type 1) fibers and develop such fibers in their efficiency and resistance to fatigue. Catabolism also improves increasing the athletes capacity to use fat and glycogen stores as an energy source. These metabolic processes are known as glycogenolysis, glycolysis and lipolysis. There is higher efficiency in oxygen transport and distribution. In recent years it has been recognized that oxidative enzymes such as succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) that enable mitochondria to break down nutrients to form ATP increase by 2.5 times in well trained endurance athletes[2] In addition to SDH, myoglobin increases by 75-80% in well trained endurance athletes.[2]

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